All about GRE…..

The GRE or Graduate Record Exam is required for admission to most U.S., Canadian, and UK graduate schools. Students are required to take GRE for pursuing Master degree in these universities. The GRE general test does not test specific knowledge in any subject. It measures the ability to respond to questions in limited time. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is a multiple-choice exam designed to measure verbal, analytical, and quantitative skills. The GRE General Test, required by most graduate schools, many vet schools, and various other allied health professional schools. The GRE Test Score is Valid for 5 years. It is considered to be a good predictor of your success in a graduate program.
Your preparation for the GRE General Test must not be a last minute cramming; etc. it must be a well planned & structured test.

Understanding GRE (Graduate Record Exam)
GRE has 3 Sections
Two Verbal Sections (38 questions and 30 min each)
Two Quantitative Sections (30 questions and 30 min each)
Two Analytical Sections (25 questions and 30 min each)
One Experimental Section (30 min)

The Experimental section is not scored, nor is it identified in the exam. It may be of a verbal, quantitative, or analytical nature.

There are some important facts to remember when taking the GRE General Test. First, each question is worth the same number of points, no matter how hard or easy it is. Second, in each section except the reading comprehension questions (in the Verbal Section), the questions tend to go from easy to difficult. Therefore, it is rash to spend too much time on early questions when you know that later ones will probably take even longer. You have somewhere around one minute or less to answer each question (on the average), so budget your time effectively. Finally, when in doubt, guess. Do not leave a question unanswered. There are no penalties on the General Test for wrong answers.

 
Verbal Section (38 questions in 30 min each)
The GRE is perhaps the most important standardized tests you’ll ever take. As difficult as it might be, there are some tried and true ways to perform very well and prepare yourself for the verbal portion of the exam. In doing so, you’ll greatly increase your odds of getting accepted into your dream program.   

Tip 1
“Go back to your basics”. Get your basic Roots, Stems, Prefixes, and Suffixes of English in place. Familiarize yourself with the prefixes of the language as these will be obvious clues as to the meanings of words and allow you to instantly eliminate some of the choices given to you. For example, “ex-” in Latin means “out of” and is commonly used in English words such as exodus, exit, extinct and so on. Knowing the prefix can tip you off to the words approximate meaning.
Tip 2
Memorize suffixes and roots of the language as it will help in analogies. This will save you so much time and energy and will pay huge dividends when you take the test. Knowing the meaning of a given suffix is like a shortcut to knowing the meaning of any given word. So, for example, “able” roughly means “can do.” And from this suffix we get “capable.” “-less” means “without” and therefore someone who is “penniless” is without money.
Tip 3
Practice taking the test. You’d be surprised at how much you can improve your score simply by becoming familiar with the restraints and procedures of the test itself. Get yourself used to the test environment. Shut yourself up in a room. Don’t take any breaks because you won’t be allowed to during the actual test. Repeat the exam as many times as you possibly can. Take the same copy of the test more than once if necessary.

Quantitative Section
The quantitative section is one of three sections on the Graduate Records Examination (GRE). This section of the GRE tests the basic mathematical concepts that you were most likely exposed to in high school. For your best score possible on the GRE quantitative section it is important to review and prepare.

Tip 1
Become familiar with the types of questions in this portion of the test. The GRE quantitative section consists of 28 questions divided between quantitative comparisons, discrete quantitative (multiple-choice) questions and data interpretation questions. Study these different question types.
Tip 2
Study a list of facts and formulas regularly used in the GRE quantitative section. These lists can be found in study guides and online. Memorizing these facts and formulas will help you save time during the test.
Tip 3
Use the diagrams provided or draw your own to help clarify a question. Diagrams provided in the GRE quantitative section are drawn to scale and can be trusted.
Tip 4
Look for mathematical shortcuts. Math problems can be solved many different ways. Try to choose the fastest and easiest method to solve problems found in the GRE quantitative section.
Tip 5
Keep track of units given in GRE quantitative questions. Some questions may ask for an answer to be given in different units than were used in the problem.
Tip 6
Take practice tests and answer sample questions to become familiar with different question types found in the GRE quantitative section.

The Analytical Writing Section  – 75 Minutes
•Issue Writing 45 Minutes
•Argument Writing 30 Minutes
The analytical writing section assesses your ability to articulate your ideas in an essay written in Standard English. It is designed to assess the candidate’s ability to express his/her ideas clearly in a written essay. Candidates are judged on whether they can support their ideas with valid examples, how clearly and succinctly they can express their thoughts, and how well they are able to use elements of the English language.

How do I register for GRE?
There are 3 ways to register for graduate record examination GRE.
•Online GRE registration visit www.ets.org
•Phone/FAX GRE Registration
•Mail GRE registration.

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